AQUACAL POOL HEATERS

by TONY
(LONG ISLAND, NY)

OUR GAS HEATER FOR OUR 20 X 40 INGROUND POOL DIED LAST YEAR.


WE ARE CONSIDERING AN AQUACAL HEAT PUMP.

HOW DOES HEATING WITH AN AQUACAL HEATER COMPARE TO OUR OLD GAS HEATER?

DOES IT TAKE ANY LONGER TO DO ITS THING, ETC.?




Thanks for the question Tony

For a 20 x 40 pool, your pool size can range between 21,000 - 33,000 gallons. I'll go in the middle and say it's 27,000.

This is what you'd probably want:

  • Model PRO1300E
  • Titanium heat exchange
  • Digital reading
  • 125,000 BTU
  • 230 volts
  • Minimum 25 GPM and a max of 80 GPM
  • About $3100

    Normally, from what I know, gas is cheaper to BUY but more expensive to RUN. So, electric is more expensive to BUY but cheaper to RUN. Of course this is a general statement and is really dependent on where you live. Some places have cheaper gas than electric and vice versa.

    That being said, my personal experience with gas and electric is this - all things being equal, I would go with gas. It heats faster and better, but again, this is my opinion.

    I'm also a big proponent of solar pool covers. It keeps the heat in and evaporation and chemical use down.

    Solar Pool Covers

    Swimming Pool Solar Covers

    I also prefer Hayward products. They have a very good and large selection of pool item and equipment and I've never had an issue with any service from them.

    I've only personally dealt with a couple of AquaCal heaters since I started pools in 1999. They seem to work fine and my customers said they never had an issue with them.

    I've heard of some stories about parts breaking, service not going the way the customer would like, rust, and their lifetime warranty - no chemical exclusions clause which seemed to be non existent when a problem arose. But this could be true of pretty much anything.

    The best thing you can do is to research and compare prices and models. Check to see what's less expensive in your area - gas or electric - then go from there. Check out the questions you can ask the dealer when purchasing your new heater:

    Electric Pool Heater

    And be sure the installer is licensed and insured. Get everything in writing.

    To post a reply, or if you have a similar question, you can see your post on the Q&A page in the "Heaters" category.

    Swimming Pool Questions & Answers

    Check back to this post for updates or answers.

    Hope this helps and have a great Summer.

    Robert

  • Click here to post comments

    Join in and write your own page! It's easy to do. How? Simply click here to return to Electric Pool Heater.

    I Have A Hayward Electric Heater..What Size New Heater Do I Need?

    by David
    (Falmouth, Mass.)

    I have an "oasis" shaped pool, 24' by 42' and 8' deepest.

    I have been heating with a Hayward Electric Heater and now need to replace it (heat exchange failed).

    What sized heater will I need and how much should I expect to pay for it?




    Thanks for the question David

    There are so many variables to finding the right pool heater.

    Here's a quick run-down:

    First is the pool size

    Total surface square feet. A larger pool will obviously mean a higher price.

    What degree temperature increase are you trying to get? This is what is referred to as Delta T. Do you want just a 5-degree increase or more, like 15 - 20 degrees?

    How much wind you have will contribute to the heating. More wind means faster heat loss and more water evaporation.

    We also need to calculate the heat loss per square foot in BTU's. This normally averages out to 10.5 BTU's.

    A basic calculation is this:

    Sizing = Surface area X Delta T (10.5) divided by the heater thermal efficiency. So in your case, a 24' X 42' pool has a surface area of approximatively 1008'.

    Let's say in MA it's a little on the cooler side, so you want a 20 degree rise and you can get an electric heater with an output efficiency of 83%.

    So it's this:

    1008 X 10.5 X 20 (degree increase) = 211680

    211680 divided by .83 = 255036

    You would need a heater with a minimum 255,000 BTU's. I believe most of the time when you're looking at heaters in the upper range of 250,000 BTU's and above, they normally go either natural gas or propane.

    You always want to go a bit higher when choosing a pool heater. That way you can dial it down a bit instead of the heater always running, trying to catch up.

    You can look at the Hayward Universal H-Series 250,000 BTU's propane or the H-Series Low Nox 300,000 Natural Gas heater.

    You're probably looking at around $1500, give a take a few.

    Electric Heaters Through Amazon

    If your present heater has given you years of service, it might be wise to just purchase the same kind.

    I hope this answers your question and have a great and safe swimming season.

    Be sure to visit my site and sign up for my free monthly E-Zine newsletter.

    Robert


    Click here to read or post comments

    Join in and write your own page! It's easy to do. How? Simply click here to return to Electric Pool Heater.

    swimming pool care, basic pool care, above ground pool maintenance, inground, salt water

    Click Here To Learn How This eBook Can Save You TONS Of Time & Money

    Click Here To Learn The Best Way To Clear Up Your Pool 

    Recent Articles

    1. Rusty Iron Bolt Stain

      I have a dark brown iron stain from a rusty bolt that the kids threw in my cement pool.

      Read More

    2. How Long Does Can We Swim After Adding Muriatic Acid To Lower The pH Level?

      We added muriatic acid to our pool to lower the swimming pool pH level. I need to know how long after we added it to swim. Thanks for your question James

      Read More

    3. Foam In The Water..Swimming Pool..How To Get Rid Of..

      We have a 20x40 kidney shaped gunite pool. It was backed washed yesterday and some DE added. Pool water tested o.k. but towards the evening bubbly or

      Read More