Can We Use The Pool If We Haven't Shocked It?

by Angel
(Houston)

We have not shocked the pool in a while (a week and a half).


I was wondering is it safe to swim in while it is not shocked or treated?

My children want to go swimming but I do not know if it's healthy or safe?

Thank you

Concerned mother




Thanks for the question

First, I'd like to have your complete chemicals readings:

Chlorine

CYA (cyanuric acid/stabilizer)

pH

Alkalinity

Calcium Hardness

Metals (iron and copper)

It makes troubleshooting much easier.

You can get this done at your local pool store.

Without these numbers I'm just guessing at what the problem is.

I'd advise you to get a Taylor FAS-DPD K-2006 pool test kit.

Pool Water Testing

Water Testing Kit

It depends on how well the pool is balanced.

I would ask why you're shocking the pool on a weekly basis? Is it because the combined chlorine (chloramines) are high or because you were told it needed to be done?

Really, the only times you need to shock is if you have an algae problem or something similar that required a pool shock, or when the combined chlorine gets above 0.6ppm for a couple of days.

If you're shocking the pool because someone told you the pool needed it on a weekly basis, regardless of what the chemical readings are, they probably are very happy to sell you more and more chemicals.

The only way to know for sure what's going on with the pool chemistry is to test it once per week, preferably twice a week.

You can take a sample of water to your local pool store for analysis until your FAS-DPD kit comes in.

If you could get me the chemical readings, I'll know what going on with your pool.

To post a reply, or if you have a similar question, you can see your post (Can We Use The Pool If We Haven't Shocked It?) on the Q&A page in the "Shocking A Pool" category.

Swimming Pool Questions and Answers

Check back to this post for answers.

Hope this helps and have a great Summer.

Robert

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Will "Shocking" The Pool Have A Bearing On The Backwash Schedule?

by J.D. Ventress
(McLeansboro, Illinois)

I have a 13,500 gal in-ground vinyl pool and have noticed when I "shock" the pool (usually on Friday nights) the Filter ARV valve will rise several points. Friday afternoon the ARV indicator needle was showing 11. I "shocked" the pool Friday night and Saturday morning the needle was showing 18 (20 would indicate a backwash needed).

I noticed this same thing last week and a few days later needed to backwash the filter as the ARV read 20. I used a one pound bag Sodium Dichloro "shock" (Aqua Chem Brand) and boosted it with one 4oz cup of granulate multi-function chlorine. I've been experiencing difficult in getting the CL to the proper level.

Appreciate your advice.

J.D. Ventress




Thanks for the question J.D.

Being that the question doesn't say whether you have a sand or DE filter, it would be difficult to give a concise answer without going through the troubleshooting of both kinds of filters.

If you could give your kind of filter it would help. Sand and DE filters have different issues. Be sure the gauge is working properly. An easy way to do this is to turn the system off. If the needle drops to zero, you're fine.

If not or if the needle sticks, replace it. I'm not aware that shocking a pool will require back washing because the pressure rises. If your pool is clean and clear, free of algae, then there shouldn't be a rise in pressure.

Concerning your shock, you're using Dichlor for every shock. This has a stabilizer in it, cyanuric acid, or CYA. If you shock with this on a regular basis your CYA will go through the roof. You want to keep the CYA between 30 - 50ppm. For every 10ppm of chlorine added with Dichlor, you'll increase the CYA by 9ppm.

I would encourage you to test for the CYA is see where it is. The kit I use and recommend is a Taylor FAS-DPD K-2006 pool test kit.

Pool Water Testing

Water Testing Kit

If it's high the only way to reduce it is to drain 1/3 - 1/2 of the water, refill, and balance out the chemicals. It would be good to have your chemical readings as well. If you keep your chlorine between 1.5 - 3.5ppm and CYA between 30 - 50ppm, there's really no reason to shock every week.

If you're shocking to get rid of the organic matter and bacteria, that's what the chlorine is for. When I had my pool route in Arizona I never did a regular shock to my customer's pools. It didn't need to because I kept the levels where they were supposed to be.

Only if you have a heavy bather load on a consistent basis or are expecting one should you shock (algae is the exception). And this should be after testing for chloramines, or combined chlorine, either with a DPD kit or your local pool store.

If the chloramines are above 0.6ppm for three consecutive days should you shock. This is when I shocked the YMCA pool. You can find your post in the "Shocking A Pool" category on the Q&A page:

Swimming Pool Questions and Answers

Give me your chemical readings and kind of filter and check back to this post for your answers. Hope this helps and I look forward to hearing from you.

Robert

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Filling A Pool

by David Hatchett
(Mesa, Az)

It's a slow process (filling my pool). Do I wait until my water level is correct before shocking it?

Do I turn on bumps at that time? What's the best shock for my 13500 Gal pebble tec pool?




Thanks for the question David

One new fills you need to shock with Dichlor chlorine. This is a stabilized form of chlorine. Once you reach the 30 - 40ppm cyanuric acid mark, stop with Dichlor and use regular liquid chlorine.

Be careful when using Dichlor as it can get out of hand quickly. For every 10ppm of chlorine added
with Dichlor, you'll raise the CYA by 9ppm. For every 10ppm of chlorine added with Trichlor tabs you'll raise the CYA by 6ppm.

Don't use ever calcium hypochlorite (granular chlorine). I know that Mesa has very hard water and you don't want to add anything else that would increase the hardness.

You should wait until the pool is filled before shocking. This way there's enough water to dilute the Dichlor. It's 2 lbs. of Dichlor to shock 12,000 gallons. You can use 2.5 lbs.

For the other question, "do I turn on bumps at that time", I really don't understand that. Please clarify so I can properly answer that part.

To post a reply, or if you have a similar question, you can see your post on the Q&A page in the "Shocking A Pool" category.

Check back to this post for updates or answers.

If you need immediate assistance (within 24 hrs) or for emergency personal assistance, you can make a donation of your choice and I'll answer your questions by phone.

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Hope this helps and have a great Summer.

Robert

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I've A Very Small (650g) Pool And I Think I Overshocked It...

by J. Comensk
(Saratoga Springs, NY)

With 2-lbs of HTH shock 3 treatment.

Filter is running and was filled for first time 2-days ago but remains cloudy.

I then read where approximately 2-5 OZ of shock is needed for this size pool.

How do I fix this before dumping and starting over?




Thanks for the question

If I'm reading the question correctly, there was 6lbs. of chlorine used. 2lbs. of chlorine used 3 times.

The amount of chlorine that was used for a 650 gallon size small pool is actually enough the shock a 25,000 gallon pool.

Trying to take the chlorine level readings would be cost and time prohibitive.

There's 3 ways to get the chlorine level down:

1. To allow it to come down naturally through the sun and heat

2. Drain and start over

3. Use a chlorine neutralizer called Thiosulfate. If you go this route you'll probably use so much of it that it will mess up your chlorine readings.

I'm also thinking about the safety issue of having a chemical reading that high.

My personal advice would be to drain it and start over again using the correct amount of chlorine.

I use 3oz. of chlorine to bring a 1000 gallon hot tub level up from 1ppm to 4ppm. This is the hot tub for the YMCA.

If you start over again, 4 - 6oz. of Dichlor chlorine should do the trick. This also has the stabilizer (cyanuric acid/CYA) in it so you'll be hitting it from both sides, which is what you want to do.

Remember, for every 10ppm of Dichlor chlorine, you'll increase the CYA by 9ppm.

Hope this helps and have a fun and safe swimming season.

Robert

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Run Pump Or Not?

I just need to know if it's ok to add liquid shock to a pool without the pump running. My pool isn't quite full enough to run the pump but it's taking days to fill it up from a well.

Hot temps are making the water green before I can get it filled all the way up. What should I do?




Thanks for the question

What you can do is to shock the pool with Dichlor. This is a stabilized form of chlorine.

Be careful when using Dichlor as it can get out of hand quickly. For every 10ppm of chlorine added with Dichlor, you'll raise the CYA by 9ppm. For every 10ppm of chlorine added with Trichlor tabs you'll raise the CYA by 6ppm.

You need to know the pool size so you don't overshoot the CYA mark. It's 1 1/3 lbs. of Dichlor per 10,000 gallons. Shock it a couple of times to get the CYA in the pool. Remember that as you add water the CYA will decrease through dilution, unless you add a massive amount of Dichlor which I hope you don't. Get the CYA around 30 ppm for now.

What's happening is you're adding unstabilized chlorine and it's getting eaten up by the sun and heat. Regular chlorine is unstabilized and you'll go through it very quickly. I'm not saying this will cure the problem. What it may do is keep some of the algae away until you can get the filter going.

You should also check for metals in the water. You're filling with well water that probably has lots of metals. Metal sequestrants that are based on HEDP, phosphonic acid and/or its derivatives are the most effective. Some popular brands are Jack's Magic Blue, Purple, and Pink Pink Stuff, Metal Magic, Metal Free, & Metal Klear.

This is normally not a one shot deal. A metal sequestrant does not remove metal from pool water. It holds it in solution until it can get filtered. Then you backwash the metal out.

Because metal sequestrants break down over time and get filtered and backwashed out, you will need to add a bottle once per week.

To post a reply, or if you have a similar question, you can see your post on the Q&A page in the "Shocking A Pool" category.

Check back to this post for updates or answers.

If you feel your situation is complex and want immediate assistance (within 24 hrs) you can make a donation of $35 per hour and I'll answer your questions by phone.

Have I helped you find a solution to your pool problems? Did this information help you? Please consider making a donation to help keep this site going. Thank you.









Hope this helps and have a great Summer.

Robert

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